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Mark Hoffman

Mark Hoffman
Assistant Professor of Sociology

About

Mark Hoffman is an Assistant Professor with the Department of Sociology and the Graduate School of Business (by courtesy) at Stanford University. His research interests include social network analysis, history, and computational social science. His work combines computational methods with large-scale historical datasets to understand how language, identity, and social structure have changed in England and the United States over the past 300 years. His current project, conditionally accepted for publication in the American Journal of Sociology, uses the reading patterns of thousands of America’s earliest political and economic elites, including a significant number of the founding fathers, who checked out books from the New York Society Library, to reveal the shifting meaning of political identity in the years between the ratification of the Constitution and the War of 1812.

Hoffman's work has appeared in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Poetics, and Sociological Science. His paper, "The (Protestant) Bible, the (printed) sermon, and the word(s)", received the Distinguished Article Award from the American Sociological Association’s section on The Sociology of Religion. He joins Stanford having completed a Ph.D. in Sociology at Columbia University. He received his B.A. in Social Research and Public Policy from NYU Abu Dhabi. More information about his work and teaching can be found on his website.