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Jun 20 2014
The New York Times quotes Tomás R. Jiménez in the article titled “On Immigration, the Hard Lines Start to Blur.” Read More
May 28 2014
The Clayman Institute for Gender Research opened its new Women’s Leadership Center last Wednesday. The new center, led by Shelley Correll, Stanford professor in sociology and director of the Clayman Institute, aims to empower the underrepresented voices of women in the workplace and promote women’s...
May 17 2014
The New York Times quotes Tomás R. Jiménez, assistant professor of sociology, on ambivalence as potentially the single emotion that defines the immigration experience. (New York Times, The Way North (series), Sat, 5/17/14...
Feb 28 2014
Must-see morning clip: Stephen Colbert learns just how racist America really is On the second to last night of the month, Stephen Colbert announced that “The Colbert Report” will be “dedicating the rest of February to African-American heritage” in honor of Black History Month.”It is such a rich,...
Feb 26 2014 | Huffington Post
DETROIT (AP) — A sociologist testifying Wednesday at Michigan's gay-marriage trial said children raised by same-sex parents suffer no handicap when compared to other kids. Michael Rosenfeld of Stanford University said "there is no basis" for believing that kids develop better in a household led by...
Feb 20 2014 | Stanford Report
Stanford research studies how people in jobs and the unemployed value free time. Both groups experience greater emotional well-being on weekends and have declines when the workweek begins. The rise in well-being and happiness on weekends is largely explained by opportunities to spend more social...
Jan 30 2014 | Stanford Report
In a new book, Stanford experts analyze the challenges and opportunities confronting South Korea and Taiwan's maturing democracies. Much depends on the political leadership in those two countries rising above narrow interests to craft thoughtful and realistic public policies. Read More
Jan 27 2014 | Stanford Report
Scholars have found that talking about people behind their backs and voting others "off the island" – can offer surprising benefits for our greater harmony. Gossip and ostracism are tools by which groups reform bullies, thwart exploitation of "nice people" and encourage cooperation. Read More

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